Organizations map out indigenous community territories of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Papua, and Java, some reported to be in conflict with mining, logging and palm oil plantation businesses concerning land use and related environmental issues.

Organizations map out indigenous community territories of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Papua, and Java, some reported to be in conflict with mining, logging and palm oil plantation businesses concerning land use and related environmental issues. Environmental non governmental organizations collaboratively launched the project site to document and track land conflicts present in disputed territories. The mapping initiative by organizations may not guarantee resolution of agrarian conflicts, assuming it is put to use as technical aid for both indigenous communities and businesses to achieve ecological resolution. Geodata mapping suggests the term “community” to a classic definition comprising locality and community sentiment, presenting indigenous communities as territorial groups. As territorial group, indigenousity is not the, not the sole at the least, feature validating authority of geographic region. Constitutionally, authority of indigenous community, masyarakat adat, concerns: externally presenting traits of indigenousity, the adat; administering indigenous rights and or welfares; resolving conflicts. Social forestry relevantly accomodates the communities’ socioeconomic rights of land use. Organizations’ main argument, however, is to regulate territories not as social forestry, but as customary land, owned by indigenous communities and administered in accordance to indigenous customs or the hak ulayat. Whether or not collaborators upholds conflict resolution principle as frame of reference, Geodata mapping is a starting point for environmental organizations in improving technical aptness in the realm of activism.

Readings: Mustain Mashud, dkk (2010)

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